Math Competition at Emory University

If you know a high schooler who is avid about math – or a very avid middle schooler – here is a free opportunity for him or her to take part in a national competition.

The American Mathematics Contest (http://amc.maa.org/) is the principal math competition for US high schoolers. Its purpose is to spur interest and develop talent in math by encouraging students to study math more intensely than they normally do in school. Generally participants take the AMC at their schools, but Emory University’s math department is making it available to students whose schools don’t offer the February 22 sitting.

Two levels are offered: the AMC 10, open to students in grades 10 or below, and the AMC 12, open to students in grade 12 or below. It’s a 75-minute, 25-problem multiple choice test.

The AMC 10 and 12 B will be offered at Emory University on Wednesday February 22 at 5:30pm. Students who would like to take either exam can register by sending Victor Larsen (vlarsen@emory.edu) the following information

a. Student name
b. Student grade
c. Student age
d. Student gender
e. Student home address
f. Student home phone
g. Student email address
h. Student’s school name
i. Student’s school CEEB# (the code used for SAT and ACT registration: http://sat.collegeboard.org/register/sat-code-search)
j. Which exam (10 or 12)

Emory’s math department will cover the full cost of the exams, so there is no charge. There is no absolute deadline; if Victor had extra exam copies he could accept last-minute registrants. However, prompt registry will help ensure he has enough time to order additional copies if needed.

To get an idea what the problems are like, see http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Wiki/index.php/AMC_Problems_and_Solutions.

There is no calculus on the AMC. The problems use algebra, geometry, probability, trigonometry, etc. The problems range from some that should be reasonably easy for A students to some that are very hard, so it is definitely more challenging than what students are used to in school. Students should not expect to finish every problem. Getting a little over half the problems correct is typically enough to put a student in the top 5% of participants.

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