The 2014 School Climate Star Ratings

Yesterday, the Georgia DOE released its “2014 School Climate Star Ratings”. CLICK HERE to read their press release and to learn more about what defines school climate.

“Each school in Georgia received a 1-5 star ratings, with five stars representing an excellent school climate, and one star representing a school climate most in need of improvement. ”

Below is a cut-and-paste of the scores for our DCSS Schools…. on each line is a school name, followed by its 2014 College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI) and then its 2014 Star Rating (1 to 5):

Narvie Harris Elementary School 71.6 – 4
Wynbrooke Elementary School 85.3 – 4
Martin Luther King, Jr. High School 61 – 3
Miller Grove High School 60.4 – 3
Flat Rock Elementary School 59 – 2
Princeton Elementary School 54.3 – 3
Destiny Achievers Academy of Excellence 38.2 – 5
DeKalb Preparatory Academy Charter 54.4 – 5
Cedar Grove High School 62.8 – 2
Vanderlyn Elementary School 93.6 – 3
Austin Elementary School 95.5 – 4
Redan High School 60.5 – 3
Eldridge L. Miller Elementary School 51.6 – 2
Panola Way Elementary School 52.4 – 3
Peachtree Middle School 80.2 – 5
Pine Ridge Elementary School 56.2 – 3
Browns Mill Elementary School 52.6 – 2
Chapel Hill Middle School 65.1 – 3
Marbut Elementary School 79.1 – 4
Cedar Grove Middle School 55.3 – 3
Freedom Middle School 52.4 – 2
Lithonia High School 59.1 – 2
Lithonia Middle School 60.8 – 3
Redan Middle School 63.7 – 2
Dunwoody Elementary School 85.6 – 4
Museum School Avondale Estates 92.4 – 5
Rockbridge Elementary School 77.4 – 2
Cedar Grove Elementary School 59.4 – 4
Stone Mountain High School 51.2 – 3
Kittredge Magnet School 91.8 – 5
Sequoyah Middle School 56.8 – 3
Salem Middle School 58.2 – 2
Shadow Rock Elementary School 63.5 – 3
Edward L. Bouie, Sr. Elementary School 69.9 – 4
Columbia Middle School 62.7 – 2
Oakview Elementary 52 – 2
Wadsworth Magnet School for High Achievers 96 – 5
Leadership Preparatory Academy 69.4 – 4
The GLOBE Academy Charter School 76.4 – 5
Fairington Elementary School 56.3 – 4
Stephenson Middle School 76.2 – 3
Robert Shaw Theme School 84.6 – 4
Mary McLeod Bethune Middle School 54.3 – 1
Chamblee Middle School 81.4 – 4
Dekalb Early College Academy 97.3 – 5
Ronald E McNair Discover Learning Academy Elementary School 43.6 – 2
DeKalb School of the Arts 95.3 – 5
Bob Mathis Elementary School 54.9 – 3
Stephenson High School 64.5 – 3
DeKalb Alternative School 33.9 – 5
East DeKalb Special Education Center NA – 5
Stone Mountain Middle School 62.3 – 3
The Champion Middle Theme School 79.5 – 4
Margaret Harris Comprehensive School 59.7 – 5
Stone Mill Elementary School 57.9 – 4
Miller Grove Middle School 60 – 3
Tucker Middle School 66.9 – 3
Gateway to College Academy 52.7 – 5
Arabia Mountain HS – Academy of Engineering, Medicine and Envir 83.1 – 5
Woodridge Elementary School 66.3 – 3
DeKalb PATH Academy Charter School 88.1 – 4
UHS of Laurel Heights NA NA
Henderson Middle School 73.3 – 4
International Community School 63.5 – 5
Elizabeth Andrews High School 41.8 – 5
Druid Hills Middle School 76.5 – 3
DeKalb Academy of Technology and the Environment Charter School 70.7 – 5
DeKalb Elementary School of the Arts 75.3 – 3
Brockett Elementary School 72.7 – 4
Chapel Hill Elementary School 59.4 – 1
Columbia Elementary School 50.7 – 5
Dresden Elementary School 58.8 – 4
Evansdale Elementary School 66.8 – 4
McNair Middle School 46.4 – 1
Idlewood Elementary School 61.8 – 4
Livsey Elementary School 84.4 – 3
Tucker High School 62.1 – 4
Woodward Elementary School 54.6 – 4
International Student Center 31.6 – 4
Allgood Elementary School 56.2 – 2
Columbia High School 57 – 1
Druid Hills High School 64.5 – 3
Fernbank Elementary School 95.6 – 5
Henderson Mill Elementary School 76.7 – 5
Indian Creek Elementary School 70.2 – 3
Knollwood Elementary School 55.5 – 2
McLendon Elementary School 63.1 – 3
Midvale Elementary School 71.4 – 3
Cary Reynolds Elementary School 56.1 – 4
Stone Mountain Elementary School 62.1 – 3
Ashford Park Elementary School 79.9 – 4
Briarlake Elementary School 78.9 – 5
Canby Lane Elementary School 48.6 – 2
Chesnut Elementary School 80.1 – 3
Dunaire Elementary School 51 – 1
Flat Shoals Elementary School 50.8 – 4
Hambrick Elementary School 64.9 – 3
Jolly Elementary School 56.7 – 5
Lakeside High School 72.4 – 4
Meadowview Elementary School 53.8 – 4
Midway Elementary School 48.8 – 3
Oak Grove Elementary School 86.4 – 3
Pleasantdale Elementary School 79.7 – 1
Rock Chapel Elementary School 69.7 – 3
Smoke Rise Elementary School 58.2 – 3
Toney Elementary School 48.7 – 4
McNair High School 44.9 – 1
Briar Vista Elementary School 81.8 – 5
Murphy Candler Elementary School 53.4 – 3
Clarkston High School 54.6 – 3
Cross Keys High School 67.4 – 3
Hightower Elementary School 63.5 – 4
Kelley Lake Elementary School 56.8 – 2
Laurel Ridge Elementary School 84.2 – 4
Montclair Elementary School 44.7 – 3
Oakcliff Elementary School 67.1 – 4
Rainbow Elementary School 66.3 – 3
Rowland Elementary School 54.1 – 2
Snapfinger Elementary School 57.3 – 4
Stoneview Elementary School 47 – 2
Towers High School 57 – 3
Coralwood Education Center 88.8 – 5
Avondale Elementary School 65.4 – 2
Chamblee Charter High School 79.8 – 3
Clifton Elementary School 47.8 – 2
Dunwoody High School 73.6 – 5
Hawthorne Elementary School 75.6 – 3
Huntley Hills Elementary School 77.3 – 5
Kingsley Elementary School 63.9 – 4
Montgomery Elementary School 87 – 5
Redan Elementary School 49.7 – 1
Sagamore Hills Elementary School 79.4 – 4
Southwest DeKalb High School 63.4 – 4

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The “School Climate Star Ratings” strike us as very misleading since you a school can have a “5-Star Rating” while also having a failing (60 or less) CCRPI.

Here are the DCSS schools that have “5-Star Ratings” and failing CCRPIs:

DeKalb Alternative School 33.9 – 5
Destiny Achievers Academy of Excellence 38.2 – 5
Elizabeth Andrews High School 41.8 – 5
Columbia Elementary School 50.7 – 5
Gateway to College Academy 52.7 – 5
DeKalb Preparatory Academy Charter 54.4 – 5
Jolly Elementary School 56.7 – 5
Margaret Harris Comprehensive School 59.7 – 5

+++

On the other hand, in case the “School Climate Star Rating” is a legitimate performance measure, here are the DCCS schools with a “1-Star” rating and CCRPI under 60:

McNair High School 44.9 – 1
McNair Middle School 46.4 – 1
Redan Elementary School 49.7 – 1
Dunaire Elementary School 51 1
Mary McLeod Bethune Middle School 54.3 – 1
Columbia High School 57 – 1
Chapel Hill Elementary School 59.4 – 1

And the DCSS schools with “2-Star” ratings and CCRPIs under 60:

Ronald E McNair Discover Learning Academy Elementary School 43.6 – 2
Stoneview Elementary School 47 – 2
Clifton Elementary School 47.8 – 2
Canby Lane Elementary School 48.6 – 2
Eldridge L. Miller Elementary School 51.6 – 2
Oakview Elementary 52 – 2
Freedom Middle School 52.4 – 2
Browns Mill Elementary School 52.6 – 2
Rowland Elementary School 54.1 – 2
Knollwood Elementary School 55.5 – 2
Allgood Elementary School 56.2 – 2
Kelley Lake Elementary School 56.8 – 2
Salem Middle School 58.2 – 2
Flat Rock Elementary School 59 – 2
Lithonia High School 59.1 – 2

+++

And the DCSS schools with a “5-Star” rating and CCRPI above 90:

Kittredge Magnet School 91.8 – 5
Museum School Avondale Estates 92.4 – 5
DeKalb School of the Arts 95.3 – 5
Fernbank Elementary School 95.6 – 5
Wadsworth Magnet School for High Achievers 96 – 5
Dekalb Early College Academy 97.3 – 5

And the DCSS school with a “4-Star” rating and CCRPI above 90:

Austin Elementary School 95.5 – 4

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21 Responses to The 2014 School Climate Star Ratings

  1. DecaturMax says:

    It will become even more difficult for teachers to send kids to the office for violent acts and severe discipline problems. Teachers are told they can’t handle their class or threatened with Professional Development Plans for sending kids to the office. This will only contribute to the blame the teacher mentality. Rewarding schools who under report reminds me of a teh APS situation. I have real doubts when failing schools have “Great ” learning environments.

  2. Not getting these scores at all >>

    Destiny Achievers Academy of Excellence 38.2 – 5
    DeKalb Preparatory Academy Charter 54.4 – 5
    DeKalb Alternative School 33.9 – 5
    East DeKalb Special Education Center NA – 5
    Margaret Harris Comprehensive School 59.7 – 5
    Gateway to College Academy 52.7 – 5
    International Community School 63.5 – 5
    Elizabeth Andrews High School 41.8 – 5
    Columbia Elementary School 50.7 – 5

  3. DunwoodyOwl says:

    Looking over the statewide list
    Fulton – Ocee Elementary 95.1 – 2
    Fulton – Dolvin Elementary 93.3 – 2
    Fulton – Summit Hill Elementary 91.8 – 2
    Gwinnett – Shiloh Elementary 88.9 – 2
    City of Decatur – Fifth Ave Elementary 87.9 – 2

    This does not seem to be an accurate predictor of performance.

  4. DecaturMax says:

    My guess is the well regarded schools above honestly report and do not punish teachers for not handling discipline within the class room.

  5. Marney says:

    I “get” the list of those with a low CCRPI score but good school climate..generally they are the “few and far between” places where there is a special population of kids that are not able to score well on exams for a number of reasons but want to learn. Basically they are special schools for: those who have dropped out and realized they want back in; special needs students that truly still want to learn; refugees and those whose families are committed to welcoming them; open or alternative campuses of last resort to kids on notice that they have screwed up and want at least their GED. It is indeed possible for kids to be behind and still want to learn. There may be pressure put on teachers to under report discipline, but let’s not assume that in all cases smart and economically well off=well behaved and the reverse is always true.

    BTW–Gateway to College just shut down.

  6. whyaminotsurprised says:

    The AJC article also pointed out that the response rates on these surveys were not very high. I also found that i was able to take the survey more than once (I took it for myself, then called my daughter over to take it as a student – it will take as many entries from the same IP address as you feel like putting in. We really did only put in one survey for me and one for her) A few parents with very high standards can completely throw things off. Also, a few administrators or teachers can take it as many times as they like to “push” the numbers. It’s like judging the quality of the American Idol singers by the popular vote.

  7. dsw2contributor says:

    Maureen Downey is covering this story at her AJC blog. I posted the following comment there:

    Maureen, you said “Twenty-seven DeKalb’s schools earned the top five star rating.”

    There is something really strange about the state DOE’s ratings: the DOE gave full credit to schools that did not fully provide data.

    For example, the “5-Star” rating is partially based upon a survey parents fill out. For this survey part of the rating, the state DOE gave 100% to one Dekalb school that did not even distribute the survey to its parents. Meanwhile, other DCSS schools that did distribute the survey to their parents received ratings based upon how the parents responded.

    Basically, the state DOE graded the homework of the schools that turned it in….. but then they gave 100% to those schools that did NOT do their homework. (Those schools should have been Zeros, not 100%!)

    In an earlier comment [to Maureen’s AJC blog], “AceptableName” provided another example of this — low participation (only 15 parents out of 483 students responded) to a survey resulted in a 5 star rating.

    I don’t know why the DOE figured their “5-Star” ratings this way. Perhaps there is an error in the Excel macro that they used to calculate the ratings?

  8. September says:

    This is a website explaining what the state was looking at.

    http://gosa.georgia.gov/overview-gadoes-school-climate-star-rating

  9. Weary Worker says:

    The star rating based on a survey can be altered by stuffing the ballot box. What is to stop an administrator from submitting multiple parent or teacher surveys with glowing results? On the other hand unhappy teachers and staff and submit multiple negative surveys. As we have seen with other online reviews much of it should be ignored.

  10. thedeal2 says:

    Meanwhile, the DeKalb Strong (anti-cityhood and anti-annexation) is using this data to bolster their stance that things aren’t that bad and that blogs like this are just perpetuating the rumor that our schools are bad when they are actually good. This is why we can’t have nice schools.

  11. ha ha that’s hilarious. Like we make up test scores… But these are not test scores – these are ‘feel good’ scores about a school’s ‘environment’. Real test scores show that we have some really, really bad schools.

  12. whyaminotsurprised says:

    Interesting that 5/6 schools w/ above 90 and 5 stars are schools that have a select, smaller group of students and flexibility to make some of their own rules – magnets or charters.

  13. Speaking of school climates >> here’s an update on Atlanta

    An epic cheating trial is coming to an end, and it could send teachers to prison for 20 years

    Prosecutors are using Georgia’s Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) to accuse former principals, teachers, and administrators of trying to boost their bonuses by conspiring to artificially raise kids’ test scores. The dozen educators on trial could go to prison for up to 20 years.

  14. Same old thing says:

    “open or alternative campuses of last resort to kids on notice that they have screwed up and want at least their GED”
    Elizabeth Andrews High (formally Open Campus) DOES NOT offer GED. We are not “allowed” to suggest that to students. As far as I know, there is no GED source of information for anyone from a DeKalb School employee. A student that is still classified as a 10th grader and is 21 years old probably needs an alternative to a regular high school diploma. However, there isn’t any other help for that student.

  15. thedeal2 says:

    These are the Yelp of school ratings. Might as well go to greatschools.org. I know of one elementary school that received a 4-5 where much turmoil is taking place, but I’m sure parents answered the survey positively so their school is viewed in a positive light. In other words, these ratings are worthless.

  16. Totally agree, thedeal2. These ratings seem very much just like greatschools.org. All simply emotional – and only coming from those who take the time to respond.

  17. @same old thing: FWIW, the Georgia Technical Colleges offer GED programs. Perhaps teachers could advise students to check into ‘dual’ enrollment?

  18. Marney says:

    @ sameoldthing. I’m sorry I assumed something not true. I thought that Dekalb schools also ran a night/school GED program out of the building that is between Clarkston Library and the Community Center. Or was that shuttered during the Crawford Lewis cuts? My larger point, which i intended as a compliment to the listed schools, Elizabeth Andrews included, is that there are places where the “scores” that are still the main basis of CCRPI scores do not reflect the fact that the kids at them have a personal goal to be educated. While i agree that how it is determined seems highly flawed, we should not assume that school climate and test score must track in all cases.

  19. @Marney: Have you ever spoken to a teacher from Elizabeth Andrews? We have, and what they describe is not a very nice ‘climate’ whatsoever. We would be better off to pay for these students to go to a tech school or judicial program and work on a GED. They do not want to sit in a high school classroom anymore for a whole host of reasons, often including incarceration issues. They are entitled to be given a different route to a high school diploma.

  20. Stan Jester says:

    The value of the climate star rating is highly suspect when, as Marney pointed out, one of the 5 star schools is shut down for poor academic performance.

    Voluntary Termination of Gateway to College Academy Charter Contract
    Gateway to College Charter School desires to terminate the Charter for the following reasons:

    The school is unable to be compliant with the new State Board Rules and regulations, approved on November 6, 2014, regarding governance autonomy.
    For the entire charter term, the school has failed to meet its academic performance goals, and has not been able to meet and exceed District and State test scores.

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