Misc Studies

Below is a collection of studies on a variety of educational topics we find interesting…

Teaching and Learning:

Charter Schools:
charterschfunding051710

georgia-charter-study-ball-state

The-Fiscal-Effects-of-School-Choice-Programs

CharterSchools_Spending-GA-Tech-Analysis

It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.
— Upton Sinclair

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Common Core:

This notion of the Common Core has been more or less revealed to be a boondoggle – another made up exercise with the goal of allowing Educrats to seem busy, informed and ‘leading’. But the truth is – as we all know — learning happens in a classroom with a reasonable number of students, a qualified teacher and the necessary materials. Period.

Below is a list of qualified evidence showing that the Common Core does not make a difference. High stakes tests don’t make a difference. [Qualified teachers with full community and administrative support make the difference.]

– Hout and Elliott (2011), Incentives and Test-Based Accountability in Education: Most recent decades of high-stakes accountability reform hasn’t work.

– French, Guisbond, and Jehlen (2013), Twenty Years after Education Reform: High-stakes accountability in Massachusetts has not worked.

– Loveless (2012), How Well Are American Students Learning?: “Despite all the money and effort devoted to developing the Common Core State Standards—not to mention the simmering controversy over their adoption in several states—the study foresees little to no impact on student learning” (p. 3).

– Mathis (2012): Existence and/or quality of standards not positively correlated with NAEP or international benchmark test data; “Further, the wave of high-stakes testing associated with No Child Left Behind (NCLB) has resulted in the ‘dumbing down’ and narrowing of the curriculum” (2 of 5).

– Whitehurst (2009), Don’t Forget Curriculum: “The lack of evidence that better content standards enhance student achievement is remarkable given the level of investment in this policy and high hopes attached to it. There is a rational argument to be made for good content standards being a precondition for other desirable reforms, but it is currently just that – an argument.”

– Kohn (2010), Debunking the Case for National Standards: CC nothing new, and has never worked before.

– Victor Bandeira de Mello, Charles Blankenship, Don McLaughlin (2009), Mapping State Proficiency Standards Onto NAEP Scales: 2005-2007: Why does research from the USDOE not show high-quality standards result in higher NAEP scores?

– Horn (2013): “The 2012 NAEP Long-Term Trends are out, and there is a good deal that we may learn from forty years of choking children and teachers with more tests with higher stakes: IT DOESN’T WORK!”

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